Objectives

The joint research for beyond 5G (JRB5G) initiative with global footprint focuses on the impact of promising technologies for the future mobile telecommunication system and targets early pre-standardization and coordination of future technology developments for beyond 5G networks and services.

The strategic roadmap of the initiative JRB5G is to define a novel, participatory approach to networking and service provisioning, redefining the smart connectivity infrastructure as a dynamic composition of all resources of participating users. This is a radical paradigm shift from the conventional operator-centric view to an inclusive prosumer-centric view. Every system participant can potentially contribute with both resources and services to the overall system and consume resources and services of the beyond 5G system.

The strategic roadmap of the initiative JRB5G is to define a novel, participatory approach to networking and service provisioning, redefining the smart connectivity infrastructure as a dynamic composition of all resources of participating users. This is a radical paradigm shift from the conventional operator-centric view to an inclusive prosumer-centric view. Every system participant can potentially contribute with both resources and services to the overall system and consume resources and services of the beyond 5G system.

In JRB5G verification and validation will be done in several real time demonstration like AI connected car of the future, Network-wide resource sharing built on distributed AI with end-to-end cybersecurity, Tactile internet with smart glasses in AR/VR and validation of beamforming in THz bands in conjunction with 200Gbits E-Band testbed.

Now that the deployment of the 5th Generation of mobile networks (5G) has successfully started all over the world, the obligatory “what is next?” question has appeared in the research community.

Yet what do we mean by “next” exactly? When and what would be considered “beyond 5G”? Many relate this question to the releases as defined in 3GPP, the main body driving the standardized features of the mobile generations seen so far. For instance, this call defines 3GPP Rel.16 to be 5G. However, to be able to look ‘beyond 5G’, one must have a good understanding of more general limitations of 5G and ideas on suitable ways to overcome these, meaning novel approaches, paradigms and technologies to be considered along with novel appealing research questions.

For that reason, this initiative understands “Beyond 5G” as both a) beyond the planned, upcoming 3GPP releases (in particular, beyond Rel 18) and as b) beyond the current 3GPP standardization scope, and even beyond the current system design philosophy. With this in mind, this initiative devotes itself to the questions that drive the modifications, features, technologies or systemic traits that should be considered for the next generational change of mobile systems. In that sense, this project aims to be a lighthouse, shedding light on the most promising waters to be navigated for the next generation of networks and services. The philosophy underlying 5G development can be roughly summarized through the idea of connecting more and different types of users better. However, what truly matters for the users are service-level properties, which 5G as a connecting network – or access network – cannot yet fully control. This hints for a potential gap between the aspirations of 5G and the actual technical specification: While the goal is to deliver mission-critical services for a panoply of user types, 5G mainly covers a single part of the overall service chain. 5G is still mainly an access technology, the specifications continue to separate the RAN and the core network, and they mainly target operator needs, providing reliable means for policy enforcement for the operators (including service levels, authorizations and precise accounting).

For the classical telecom operators, the roadmap laid out by 5G is promising and challenging at the same time: While it promises novel types of IT service offerings and, generally, puts telecom operators closer to the service-level value-chain, supporting the so-called vertical industries is challenging, because of the vast variety of functional and extra-functional service requirements. Beyond the desire to drive a greater integration of vertical and telecommunication industries, we also see a strong opportunity to address the overall societal goals that this generation faces: It is specifically in the responsibility of the aforementioned industries to drive sustainability, not only through enabling new sustainable technologies, but also by increasing sustainability in ICT itself. More specifically, we assert that some of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals [UN2015] are only addressable through improved and integrated networks and services, while the European Union Green Deal [EU2019] relies on European leadership in communication technologies to achieve its ambitious objectives.

Our mission is to explore promising directions to support such high pace and high volume development of the ICT industry under the light of the increasing sustainability pressure, and to provide objective evidence for the most promising individual technologies to be considered by the relevant communities (e.g. the 5GIA and the upcoming Smart Network and Services PPP, AIoTI, 5GACIA, NGMN, GSMA, etc.), i.e. classical users, vertical industries, equipment vendors, service providers, but also regulators and policy makers.

First attempt for building a joint effort towards the aforementioned goals is the formation of KAIROS research proposal.